Genetic Factors That Can GuideLyme Treatment  orHow to Identify the “SensitivePatient” with Lyme Disease:Biotoxin Illness and Methylation
ILADS Presentation 2012
© 2012 Wayne Anderson ND
All Rights Reserved
wayneanderson.com
There is a subpopulation of patients with Lymedisease that are difficult to treat. Who are theseSensitive Patients andWhy are they important for us to identify?
Hypothesis:
There Are Clinical VariablesThat Can Predict a Patient’s Response  to Treatment.
These patients are atypical in their
 response to treatment.
Let’s call them the Sensitive Patients.
Outline: The Sensitive Patient and
Lyme Disease Treatment
1.Who are the Sensitive Patients and why are theyimportant?
2.Important historical information that can help identifythese Sensitive Patients.
3.Signs that Sensitive Patients can have on physical exam.
4.Review of the Immune System & HLA-DRB-DQ, and what itcan tell us about the Sensitive Patient.
5.Sensitive Patients can have common genetic factors suchas: HLA-DRB-DQ, Methylation, KPU/HPL.
6.Sensitive Patients are more likely to have excessExcitotoxins such as: Glutamate:GABA, Histamine,
      Ammonia, and Sulfites.
Why Is It Helpful For Us To IdentifyThese Sensitive Patients?
To be able to identify these Sensitive Patients beforetreatment could save us and them much aggravation.
These Sensitive Patients are difficult to treat.
The Sensitive Patient can have a dramatic (often bad)response to the smallest amount of a medication.
The ER staff knows who these Sensitive Patients are,
    and so should you to prevent that ER visit.
The Sensitive Patient will react in ways that scare theirfriends and family.
Their family doctors often are more critical of ourtreatment due to their patient’s weird response.
Who Are These Sensitive Patients?
Immune suppressive disorders, like Lyme disease,have a disproportionate number of theseSensitive Patients.
There are signs and symptoms that can help toidentify the Sensitive Patient.
These Sensitive Patients have genetically uniquemarkers.
These are the patients we will encounter in thetreatment of Lyme that will react in atypicalways.
Making the DNA Connections:Lifestyle, Heredity and Environment
DNA_methylation.jpg
How to Predict a Patient’s Tolerance to Treatment:Genetics, Environment, Metabolic
Genetic Factors
HLA-DRB
Methylation
KPU/HPL
Health History & PE
Chemical Sensitivities
Mold Sensitivity
Food Allergies
Physical Exam
Metabolic Factors
Detoxification
Gut Health
Ammonia
Histamine
Glutamate:GABA
SulfitesSulfates
Outline: The Sensitive Patient and
Lyme Disease Treatment
1.Who are the Sensitive Patients and why are theyimportant?
2.Important historical information that can help identifythese Sensitive Patients.
3.Signs that Sensitive Patients can have on physical exam.
4.Review of the Immune System and what it can tell usabout the Sensitive Patient.
5.Sensitive Patients can have common genetic factorssuch as: HLA-DRB-DQ, Methylation, KPU/HPL.
6.Sensitive Patients are more likely to have excessExcitotoxins such as: Glutamate:GABA, Histamine,
      Ammonia, and Sulfites.
Health History
Autoimmune disorders.
Drug sensitivities; sensitive to very small doses.
Weird drug reactions not on the side effect list.
Long drug allergy list (not true allergies).
Chemical sensitivities.
Chronic allergies often with a variety of triggers,most commonly mold.
Food allergies, always gluten and others,randomly or consistently.
Mold Sensitivities
Is their immune response immediate ordelayed?
Do they have an immediate immuneresponse?
Do they have evidence of mucous membraneinflammation with or without colonization?
Do they have a build up of intracellular
    mycotoxin?
Chemical Sensitivities
Must ask about:
Petrol-based chemicals
Perfumes
Car exhaust
Scented cleaning supplies
Carpet, fabric, and plastic gas off
This is just a tiny fraction of what we are allexposed to daily. Start general and get specific.They could be very sensitive but it all blends intogether.
Food Allergies
Part of the complete GI history.
How many food allergies/sensitivities do theyreport?
How rigid do they need to be?
What is their symptomatic response, local orsystemic?
How severe and low long does it last?
This is often an autoimmune response!
Get Specifics about “The Reaction”
When exposure is minimal:
What symptoms come up?
Are they part of their chronic familiar complex?
Are they new or random symptoms?
How long do they last?
When exposure is prolonged:
What symptoms come up, familiar or random?
How long do they last?
Outline: The Sensitive Patient and
Lyme Disease Treatment
1.Who are the Sensitive Patients and why are theyimportant?
2.Important historical information that can help identifythese Sensitive Patients.
3.Signs that Sensitive Patients can have on physicalexam.
4.Review of the Immune System and what it can tell usabout the Sensitive Patient.
5.Sensitive Patients can have common genetic factorssuch as: HLA-DRB-DQ, Methylation, KPU/HPL.
6.Sensitive Patients are more likely to have excessExcitotoxins such as: Glutamate:GABA, Histamine,
      Ammonia, and Sulfites.
Physical Exam
On Physical Exam the Sensitive Patient can have:
A tender, bloated or sensitive abdomen.
Hepatomegaly or tight ligaments around the liver.
Mild splenomegaly or tenderness over the spleen topercussion.
Gastric tenderness to percussion or palpation.
Diffuse muscle tenderness to fibromyalgia.
Diffuse lymphadenopathy.
Percussion tenderness over the kidneys.
These are usually functional illnesses and little showson PE.  We are still looking for the most stressedorgan system.
Hypothesis: The Results of the LabCorpTest HLA-DRB Can Be a Predictor of the Sensitive Patient
Brought to our attention in 2005 by RitchieShoemaker in his book Mold Warriors.
He presents patterns of these Immune Systemsignaling agents as indicating a patient'spredisposition to the family of neurotoxins:Mold, Lyme, Dinoflagellates, MARCoNS and agroup he calls multisusceptible.
Could this LabCorp HLA-DRB (#012542, ICD-9:297.10) be a consistent marker to identify theseSensitive Patients?
Outline: The Sensitive Patient and
Lyme Disease Treatment
1.Who are the Sensitive Patients and why are theyimportant?
2.Important historical information that can help identifythese Sensitive Patients.
3.Signs that Sensitive Patients can have on physical exam.
4.Review of the Immune System and what it can tell usabout the Sensitive Patient.
5.Sensitive Patients can have common genetic factorssuch as: HLA-DRB-DQ, Methylation, KPU/HPL.
6.Sensitive Patients are more likely to have excessExcitotoxins such as: Glutamate:GABA, Histamine,
      Ammonia, and Sulfites.
It’s Always a Good Time for anImmune System Review
HLA-DR: 10 Allele strands on Chromosome 6.
Cell surface receptors plays a central role in theImmune System expressed as Antigen PresentingPeptides (APC).
APC are B-cells (lymphocytes), Dendritic cells, and
     macrophages.
APC’s are up-regulated in response to signaling.
An invader binds to a receptor (on the DR molecule)and the APC introduces this infectious agent to T cellreceptors on T helper cells.
These cells bind to antigens on the surface of B cellsstimulating B cell proliferation.
Outline: The Sensitive Patient and
Lyme Disease Treatment
1.Who are the Sensitive Patients and why are theyimportant?
2.Important historical information that can help identifythese Sensitive Patients.
3.Signs that Sensitive Patients can have on physical exam.
4.Review of the Immune System & HLA-DRB-DQ and whatit can tell us about the Sensitive Patient.
5.Sensitive Patients can have common genetic factors suchas: HLA-DRB-DQ, Methylation, KPU/HPL.
6.Sensitive Patients are more likely to have excessExcitotoxins such as: Glutamate:GABA, Histamine,
      Ammonia, and Sulfites.
Antigen Presenting Cells
macrophage2.jpg
Macrophages, B-cells and Dendritic cells
T cell Need to be “Turned On”
T cells cannot recognize, and therefore react to, 'free'antigen. T cells can only 'see' antigen that has beenprocessed and presented by cells via an MHC molecule.Most cells in the body can present antigen to CD8+ Tcells via MHC class I molecules and, thus, act as"APCs;” however, the term is often limited to thosespecialized cells that can prime T cells (i.e., activate a Tcell that has not been exposed to antigen, termed anaive T cell). These cells, in general, express MHC classII as well as MHC class I molecules, and can stimulateCD4+ ("helper") cells as well as CD8+ ("cytotoxic") Tcells, respectively.
Dendritic Cell Stimulates T cell
dc-interacts-t-cell.jpg
Macrophage & Bacteria
T-cell Differentiation: (Th1, Th2, Th17 & T reg)
t-cell 17F1.large.jpg
More T-cell Differentiation
400px-Lymphocyte_activation.png
HLA Helps the Immune SystemRecognize the Treatment &Calls For Reinforcements
The primary function of HLA-DR is to present peptideantigens, potentially foreign in origin, to the immunesystem for the purpose of eliciting or suppressing T-(helper) cell responses that eventually lead to theproduction of antibodies against the same peptideantigen. Antigen presenting cells (macrophages, B-cellsand dendritic cells) are the cells in which DR aretypically found. Increased abundance of DR 'antigen'on the cell surface is often in response to stimulation,and, therefore, DR is also a marker for immunestimulation.
T-cells or T LymphocytesCell Mediated Immunity
microscopy-image-showing-immune-system-t-cells670.jpg
The Life History of T Lymphocytes
Precursors mature in the thymus
Naïve CD4+ and CD8+ T cells enter the circulation
Naïve T cells circulate through lymph nodes
 and find antigens: responding to APC
T cells are activated and develop into
effector and memory cells 
Effector T cells migrate to sites of infection 
T cells activate B cells 
Eradication of infection 
T “reg” cells call off the  B cells as the threat is over 
B memory cells continue the watch for return of antigen
along with T memory cells.
CD8 cell (Cytotoxic T-cell) against Virus
CD8 CELLSa2.png
Roles of T cell Subsets in Disease
• Th1: autoimmune and inflammatory
     diseases (IBD?, MS?, RA?; tissue damage
      in infections).
     Activation of macrophages.
• Th2: allergies (e.g. asthma)
     Stimulation of IgE responses, activation of
     eosinophils.
• Th17: inflammatory diseases (MS, IBD, RA)
   Recruitment of leukocytes.
B-cells: Humoral Immune Response &Adaptive Immune System
 B cells 060920191637.jpg
B-cells & Humoral Immune Response
Make antibodies against antigen.
Performs the role of antigen presenting cells (APC).
Develop in the bone marrow.
Migrate to secondary lymphoid tissue (lymph nodes,spleen, Peyer’s Patches, etc.).
Each B-cell has a unique receptor protein (BCR) onthe surface that will bind to one particular antigen.
Differentiates into plasma B and memory B cells(with the help of T helper cells).
HLA-DR Defects
Poor recognition specific to the antigen coding.
Genes involved in the steps of antibodyrecognition work slower.
Immune stimulation of the cell surface delayed.
Weak peptide antigens are signal specific to theinvader (bacteria, mold, chemical toxin, parasite)resulting in weak activation of T helper cells.
T cells activity will be stimulated or suppressedspecific to the pathogen coding resulting inantibody production to the antigen.
B-cell activation.png
Immune_system_lg.jpg
Function of CD4 T-cells and Cytokines
Antibodies and Antigens
antibody-and-antigen-2819.jpg
T Regulatory Cells & Autoimmunity
Autoimmunity, susceptibility and resistancehave multiple controls and T regs are key.
Once the invading threat has passed, T cells(CD4) + Cytotoxic T cell (CD8) differentiateinto T reg cells.
They turn off B-cells.
Suppress autoimmunity and inflammation.
Converts to Th 17 and T memory cells.
Regulatory T cells
Regulatory-T-cells-CD8+-limit-the-production-of-autoantibodies-they-would-avoid-autoimmune-diseases..jpg
The Sensitive Patient and
Lyme Disease Treatment
1.Who are the Sensitive Patients and why are theyimportant?
2.Important historical information that can help identifythese Sensitive Patients.
3.Signs that Sensitive Patients can have on physical exam.
4.Review of the Immune System & HLA-DRB-DQ andwhat it can tell us about the Sensitive Patient.
5.Sensitive Patients can have common genetic factorssuch as: HLA-DRB-DQ, Methylation, KPU/HPL.
6.Sensitive Patients are more likely to have excessExcitotoxins such as: Glutamate:GABA, Histamine,
      Ammonia, and Sulfites.
HLA-DRB: PossiblePredisposition Patterns
Multiple Susceptibilty
Mold
Borrelia, Post Lyme
Dinoflagellates
Multiple Antibiotic Resistant Staph Epidermidis
Low MSH
What useful information can this test give us?
Individual patient neurotoxin susceptibility.
It can be an indication of what might be affecting the patient’smetabolic background/ terrain/ stuck in their extracellularspace.
Can inform us about how to prioritize treatment.
Limitations of the tests usefulness:
It is not specific to what the patient is struggling with in themoment.
These genes need to be activated before they become a factorfor a specific patient.
HLA-DRB: Its Strengths and Weaknesses
in Guiding Treatment
HLA: What to Expect from the Lab Test?.
A long list of what looks like license plate numbers.
After running them through the secret decoder ringthey separate into different categories.
These neurotoxin categories include susceptibility to:Toxic mold species, the chemical toxins, Lyme and theco-infection, and MARCoNS and the dinoflagellates.
Patients can be heterozygous or homozygous for anyof these above categories.
Patients can have a marker that is related tohormonal function relative to the above categories(Hypothalamic dysregulation, low MSH).
Let’s Orient to the HLA-DRB-DQ“But it looks like a bunch oflicense plate numbers!”
Make a copy of the HLA graph that comes from Appendix 5 of
Dr. Shoemaker’s Mold Warriors.
The HLA allele strands are across the top or horizontal axis,
      as DRB1, DQ, DRB3, DRB4, & DRB5.
The conditions are on the vertical axis: multisusceptible,
     mold, etc.
Now the LabCorp result:
Down the left column running vertically: DRB1, DRB2,
     DRB3, DRB4, DRB5.
Moving across horizontally  from these numbers are the
     results: as a nonsensical combination of numbers and letters.
 
ilads217.jpg
Interpretation of the HLA-DRB-DQStart With DRB1
We are only interested in the first two numbers in eachline. Ignore number or letter after the first two.
Identify the first two numbers after DRB1.
On the HLA Rosetta Stone form move verticallydown from the DRB1 on the top horizontal column.
Circle all the similar numbers in that column.
Do this for both of the two DRB1’s.
Ex: If the number is 11, circle all the 11’s in thatcolumn.
Interpretation of the HLA-DRB-DQNext Look for the DRB2
On the LabCorp results find DRB2.
Find the first two numbers across from it,ignoring any or the other numbers or letters.
Transfer there numbers to the HLA Rosetta Stonechart.
Find the DQ column and circle the numbers inthat column that correspond to the two sets ofnumbers.
Ex: If the number is 03, circle all the 03’s in thecolumn.
Interpretation of the HLA-DRB-DQ DRB3 Comes Next
Any number entry in the LabCorp DRB3 resultswill be interpreted as 52.
The 01, 02, or 03 will be interpreted as A, B, or Crespectively.
Ex: DRB3 of 01 will be a 52A,
    DRB3 of 02 will convert to 52B and
    DRB3 of 03 will change to 52C
Find the DRB3 on the HLA Rosetta Stone form andmove down vertically .
Circle all 52A, B and C’s in this column.
Interpretation of the HLA-DRB-DQ DRB4 Comes Next
Any number entry in the LabCorp DRB4 resultswill be interpreted as 53.
Find the DRB4 column on the HLA Rosetta Stoneform and move down vertically.
Circle all the 53’s in this column.
Interpretation of the HLA-DRB-DQFinally the DRB5
Any number entry in the LabCorp DRB5 resultswill be interpreted as 51.
Find the DRB5 column on the HLA RosettaStone form and move down vertically.
Circle all the 51’s in this column.
Interpretation of the HLA-DRB-DQThe 03 to 17 (DRB1) Exception
Not quite the final.
When you see 03 as one of the two genes, anallele, for DRB1, rewrite it as 17.
Go to DRB1 column and look for all the 03’sthat are circled and change them to 17.
Interpretation of the HLA-DRB-DQ“Now you have the secret decoder ring!”
Now you are ready to interpret the patterns.
Any set of three allele strands on the same lineacross the chart (horizontally) are a match.
Notice what category it is in - multisulticecptible,mold, Borrelia, Dinoflagellates, MARCoNS, LowMSH, etc.
Notice if the three alleles that line uphorizontally
    are in the same or different categories.
Interpretation of the HLA-DRB-DQThe 1-5 Exception
The exception to needing three strands to line up isthe 1-5 exception.
A DRB1 of 01 with a DQ of 05 does not need a thirdallele strand to complete it.
The 1-5 is the Low MSH pattern.
Dr. Shoemaker calls this the HypothalamicDysfunction pattern.
This, in my experience, creates more instability inthe hormones.
Patient’s with Neurotoxic Illness can have difficultywith hormonal imbalance. For the 1-5’s this is worse.
Multisusceptible
chemical_toxicity.jpg
Four possiblepatterns:
4-3-53
11-3-52B
12-3-52B
14-5-52B
Mold
mold30.jpg
Four Patterns:
7-2/3-53
13-6-53 A,B,C
17-2-52 A
18-4-52 A
Borrelia,Post Lyme
Borrelia_burgdorferi-SPL.jpg
Twopossiblepatterns:
15-6-51
16-5-51
ilads217.jpg
ilads248.jpg
ilads210.jpg
ilads211.jpg
ilads233.jpg
ilads220.jpg
ilads229.jpg
ilads218.jpg
ilads202.jpg
ilads249.jpg
ilads217.jpg
ilads206.jpg
ilads207.jpg
ilads208.jpg
ilads209.jpg
ilads217.jpg
ilads248.jpg
ilads210.jpg
ilads211.jpg
ilads213.jpg
ilads214.jpg
ilads212.jpg
ilads215.jpg
ilads217.jpg
ilads220.jpg
ilads221.jpg
ilads222.jpg
ilads223.jpg
ilads224.jpg
ilads225.jpg
Biological Terrain: How the BodyInteracts with the Environment
Teamwork.jpg
Methylation Pathway
Trans-Sulfuration Pathway
Ammonia
Glutamate:GABA
Mast Cell Degranulation
KPU/HPL
Methylation:
Mechanism by which our cellsmove waste.
Phase 2 liver detox process.
Genetic mutations in thiscomplex process can predisposean individual to illness.
Pop Quiz
Question: In the medical field who knowsthe most about methylation?
Answer: The pharmaceutical companies.
Why: Because new drug trials do not want tohave people in their studies who will skewtheir results.
Outline: The Sensitive Patient and
Lyme Disease Treatment
1.Who are the Sensitive Patients and why are theyimportant?
2.Important historical information that can help identifythese Sensitive Patients.
3.Signs that Sensitive Patients can have on physical exam.
4.Review of the Immune System & HLA-DRB-DQ, andwhat it can tell us about the Sensitive Patient.
5.Sensitive Patients can have common genetic factorssuch as Methylation, KPU/HPL.
6.Sensitive Patients are more likely to have excessExcitotoxins such as: Glutamate:GABA, Histamine,
      Ammonia, and Sulfites.
Methylation Cycle by Yasko
methylationdiagram-1.jpg
Consequences of Mutations
methylationmage002.jpg
In Genetic Bypass, Amy Yasko writes:
Potential consequences of variation in thegenes in the methylation pathway can includedecreased Methylation:
Decreased methylation can result in:
Neurological issues
Cancer
Aging
CVD
Retroviral transmission
Down’s syndrome
Neural deficits
In Genetic Bypass, Amy Yasko writes: Potentialconsequences of variation in the genes in themethylation pathway can include
 increased homocysteine.
Increased homocysteine can cause:
Renal failure
Stroke
Heart Attack
Diabetes
Alzheimer’s dx
Neural defects
In Genetic Bypass, Amy Yasko writes:Potential consequences of variation in the genesin the methylation pathway can includeElevated Ammonia:
Elevated Ammonia can result in:
Flapping tremors of extended arms.
Disorientation, brain fog.
Hyperactive reflexes.
Activation of MNDA receptors leading to glutamateexcitotoxicity.
Tremors of the hands.
Paranoia, panic attacks.
Memory loss to Alzheimer’s disease.
Hyperventilation.
CNS Toxicity.
In Genetic BypassAmy Yasko writes: Potentialconsequences of variation in the genes in themethylation pathway can include Decreased BH4.
Decreased BH4 can result in:
Diabetes.
Atypical phenylketonuria PKU.
Decreased dopamine levels.
Decreased serotonin levels.
Hypertension.
Atherosclerosis.
Decreased NOS.
Endothelial dysfunction.
Methylation is Not Child’s Play
bart.gif
MethylGroup.gif
Methylation is the Cornerstone ofTreatment for The Sensitive Patient.
All of the above are very important, but I amconcerned about the implications methylationhas on every cell of the body and the methylationpathway in the liver.
It is primarily about detoxification.
These patients are sensitive because their wasteremoval systems are underperforming. They areswimming in waste, their rain barrel is full.
For the very toxic Lyme Patient the majority oftheir treatment needs to be detoxification.
Pop Quiz
Question: In the medical field who knowsthe most about methylation?
Answer: The pharmaceutical companies.
Why: Because new drug trials do notwant to have people in their studieswho will skew their results.
Rich van Konynenburg KnowsMethylation: Check out his Writings
Rich van Konynenburg's idea is that ineffective methylation is amajor cause of fatigue. There are many possible reasons, but thosethat he's identified for which methylation is essential are:
• To produce vital molecules such as CoQ10 and carnitine.• To switch on DNA and switch off DNA. This is achieved byactivating and deactivating genes by methylation. This is essentialfor gene expression and protein synthesis. Proteins of course makeup the hormones, neurotransmitters, enzymes, immune factors andare fundamental to good health. When viruses attack our bodies,they take over our own DNA in order to replicate themselves. If wecan't switch DNA/RNA replication off then we will become moresusceptible to viral infection. • To produce myelin for the brain and nervous system.
Methylation: The Basics 2
Our metabolic/biochemical backbone.
Methyl group a carbon with 3 hydrogens (CH3).
This is our waste removal de-assembly line in all ourcells with a large methylation shoot in the liver.
Genes that convert nutrients to activated forms: B6 toP5P, Folate to 5-Methyltetrahydrofolate (5MTHFR), etc.
Determines resistance or susceptibility to multipleenvironmental factors (toxins and microbes).
Can be a predisposing factor to illness.
Can be a reason for unexplained and chronic conditions.
Methylation: The Basics 3
Necessary for cell mediated immunity.
Switches on synthesis of DNA and RNA.
Function of immune, detoxification, andantioxidant systems.
Our ability to heal and repair.
We need methyl groups to silence viral RNA andneutralize toxins.
The more methylation defects, the moresusceptible we are to the increasing presence ofchemical toxins.
ilads226.jpg
ilads227.jpg
ilads228.jpg
DNA Switching
Switching DNA on and off is achieved by activating anddeactivating genes via methylation. This is essentialfor gene expression and protein synthesis. Proteins ofcourse make up the hormones, neurotransmitters,enzymes, immune factors and are fundamental to goodhealth. When viruses attack our bodies, they take overour own DNA in order to replicate themselves. If wecan't switch DNA/RNA replication off then we willbecome more susceptible to viral infection.
This is also about new cell healing.
transsulfuration_pathway.jpg
Methylation Cycle by Yasko
methylationdiagram-1.jpg
Outline: The Sensitive Patient and
Lyme Disease Treatment
1.Who are the Sensitive Patients and why are theyimportant?
2.Important historical information that can help identifythese Sensitive Patients.
3.Signs that Sensitive Patients can have on physical exam.
4.Review of the Immune System & HLA-DRB-DQ, and whatit can tell us about the Sensitive Patient.
5.Sensitive Patients can have common genetic factors suchas:, Methylation, KPU/HPL & Trans-Sulfuration Pathway.
6.Sensitive Patients are more likely to have excessExcitotoxins such as: Glutamate:GABA, Histamine,Ammonia, and Sulfites.
Trans-Sulfuration Pathway
CBS gene initates the Trans-Sulfuration Pathway
Up-regulated CBS gene increases the activity inthe pathway as much as 10 times.
Converts homocysteine into cystathionine.
Producing toxic levels of cytathioninemetabolites: ammonia and sulfite/sulfate.
Common to 90% of tested patients.
Associated with PKU.
methy with pathwys.jpg
Ammonia
Neutralized by Two BH4
nh3molecule.jpg
Elevated Ammonia:
Disorientation, brain fog
Hyperactive reflexes
Glutamate excitotoxicity
Tremors in the hands
Panic attacks
Memory loss
CNS toxicity
Alzheimer’s dx
Do You Smell Ammonia? No.
no_ammonia1.jpg
She does!
It’s in her nose, in her stool, urine
or coming through her skin.
Understanding the Ammonia Burden
Protein contains nitrogen compounds, and whenmetabolized, has ammonia as a by product.
An up regulated CBS gene degrades protein morequickly to NH4.
It takes 2 BH4 molecules to neutralize one ammoniamolecule.
Labs: Serum Homocysteine, ammonia, and VitaminD levels, creatinine and liver chemistries.
24 hour ammonia urine.
Toxic metal urine challenge (DMPS and CaEDTA).
Consider DMPS skin test for sensitivity.
Mineral and antioxidants intracellular evaluations.
How to Treat It:Soak Up the Ammonia
Yucca ½ capsule 2 x daily (with protein).
RNA Ammonia, ½ dropper 2 x daily with meals.
Charcoal is a very effective ammonia binder,
    also binding just about anything else you takearound it and it can be constipating.
Magnesium to bowel tolerance.
Inducing diarrhea is the conventional medicalapproach.
When NH4 goes toCardiovascular Disease
Provide more Methyl groups with:
NADH 5 mg.
Coenzyme Q10 100 mg or Idebenone 100 mg.
Carnitine 500-1000 mg daily.
Ribose 5 grams in water, two to three timesdaily.
ilads229.jpg
ilads230.jpg
ilads231.jpg
ilads232.jpg
Methylation Cycle by Yasko
methylationdiagram-1.jpg
BH 4
BH4mage024.jpg
Low BH4 levels canbe due to:
CBS upregulation
MTHFR defects
Bacterial infection
Toxic metal loads
Tetrahydrobioterin (BH4) Cycle
CBS upregulation and BHMT deficiency leads to low BH4.
BH4 is essential for CNS function.
BH4 is the rate limiting variable for the synthesis of dopamine,norepinephrine, serotonin, melatonin and nitric oxide synthases(NOS).
BH4 prevents glutathione depletion, thus protecting dopaminergicneurons.
Damage or loss of dopaminergic function has been implicated in avariety of neuropsychiatric disorders, including Parkinson’s disease,schizophrenia, autism, bipolar syndrome, ADHD, etc.
BH4 is involved in CoQ10 production, lipids metabolism and plateletaggregation.
Less BH4 inhibits the conversion of tryptophan to serotonin andtyrosine to dopamine, resulting in low levels of theseneurotransmitters. 
Signs and Symptoms of Low BH4
Intolerant of sulfur drugs, sulfites/sulfatescontaining foods, DMPS, wine, glucosaminesulfate.
Low homocysteine levels < 5.0 (ignore the labsreference range of 0-12).
Elevated to high normal ammonia serum levels(must be processed by the lab immediately).
The MTHFR defect (A1298C) affects theconversion of dihydrobiopterin (BH2) totetrahydrobiopterin (BH4).
Higher heavy metal loads (suppress BH2 to BH4).
ilads218.jpg
ilads200.jpg
ilads219.jpg
ilads201.jpg
Dosing of BH4
Dosing is individualized depending on thepatient’s sensitivity:
BH4 (even when it is needed) will not work untilthe patient has been on the methylation protocolto maximize effectiveness through theSAMe/SAH cycle and the Folic acid cycle.
Notice if the patient at first feels better thenworse (opening the pathway too quickly).
Could cause a neurotransmitter surge.
2.5 mg up to 4 times daily to 200 mg daily is safe.
The Sensitive Patient and
Lyme Disease Treatment
1.Who are the Sensitive Patients and why are theyimportant?
2.Important historical information that can help identifythese Sensitive Patients.
3.Signs that Sensitive Patients can have on physical exam.
4.Review of the Immune system and what it can tell usabout the Sensitive Patient.
5.Sensitive Patients can have common genetic factors suchas: HLA-DRB-DQ, Methylation, KPU/HPL.
6.Sensitive Patients are more likely to have excessExcitotoxins such as: Glutamate:GABA, Histamine,
      Ammonia, and Sulfites.
The Sulfur Burden
sulfur-crystals-from-wiki.jpg
.
To control sulphur metabolism of the body, not justglutathione needs to be limited but also cysteine,taurine and sulphate. This is an important processfor detoxification.
Sulfite to Sulfate
Sulfite is neurotoxic. Sulfate is irritating to thenerves.
CBS upregulation can cause  an overproductionof Sulfites.
The enzyme Sulfite Oxidize (SUOX) convertssulfites to sulfates.
SOUX, that produces the enzyme Sulfite Oxidize,can be genetic defective, slowing the conversionof sulfite to sulfate.
Methylation and KPU/HPL can have a synergeticeffect contributing to increasing the sulfiteburden.
Sulfite/SulfateSymptomatic Presentations
Inflammation of the nervous system.
Reactive mucous membrane: Skin with hives,rashes, frequent allergic reactions to varioussupplements, food, drugs, etc.
Reactive gut.
Sympathetic (or sympathomimetic) response.Racing heart, elevated heart rate, dilated pupilsas the fight-flight system is activated.
Epinephrine and norepinephrine activation.
Sulfite/SulfateSymptomatic Presentations
Nervous System: Headache, tremor, migraine,palpitations, sweats.
Mood: Nervousness, anxious irritable mood, dizzy,spacey, brain fog, impaired concentration, behaviorchange, hyperactivity in children.
Abdominal: Abdominal pain, nausea, diarrhea,bloating, IBS.
Skin: Hives, angioedema, burning skin, eczema.
Head: rhinitis, facial tightness, mucous build up, eyelidswelling.
Lungs: Chest tightness, breathing problems, asthma.
Sulfite to Sulfate Treatment
Activation of SOUX enzyme to reduce the Sulfur burden:
Molybdenum 500 mcg twice a day.
Boron 3 mg/day.
Vitamin E succinate 400 IU/day, and
Hydroxy-B12 2000 mcg/day are also utilized to speedup SUOX activity.
Must avoid sulfur compounds:
Amino acids (taurine, cysteine, & methionine).
Supplements (glutathione, MSM, NAC, a-lipoic acid,DMSA, DMPS).
Foods (garlic, onion, eggs, animal protein, etc.).
Drugs that are sulfur containing and could increase thesulfur burden.
Outline: The Sensitive Patient and
Lyme Disease Treatment
1.Who are the Sensitive Patients and why are theyimportant?
2.Important historical information that can help identifythese Sensitive Patients.
3.Signs that Sensitive Patients can have on physical exam.
4.Review of the Immune System & HLA-DRB-DQ, and whatit can tell us about the Sensitive Patient.
5.Sensitive Patients can have common genetic factors suchas: Methylation, KPU/HPL & Trans-Sulfuration Pathway.
6.Sensitive Patients are more likely to have excessExcitotoxins such as: Glutamate:GABA, Histamine,Ammonia, and Sulfites.
Glutamate Neuro-Excitatory
glutamate3_03c.gif
Glutamate:The Excitotoxic Neurotransmitter
The CBS upregulation leads to excess productionof alpha-ketoglutarate, which is converted intoglutamate.
Enzymatic failure to convert Glutamate to GABA.
Excess glutamate deficiency of GABA.
Glutamate is also the precursor to our primaryinhibitory or calming neurotransmitter, GABA.
Causes of GABA:Glutamate Imbalance
Genetic up-regulated CBS causes excess alpha-ketoglutarate blocking enzyme glutamatedecarboxylase (GAD) that converts Glutamine toGABA.
Elevated lead, aluminum and mercury.
Excessive intake of aspartame, glutamate, and foodswith alpha-ketoglutarate.
Viral infections lead to enzymes blocking B6.
Immune suppression against viral infection can leadto antibodies against the vitamin B6 dependentenzyme GAD, blocking GABA production.
Symptoms of Excitotoxicity
Agitated, aggressive behavior.
Various neuropathic presentations to nerve damage.
Stimulatory behavior in autistic kids (“stims”).
Anxiety.
Sleeplessness in adults.
Poor socialization, poor eye contact.
Nystagmus.
Impaired speech.
Constipation.
Learning difficulties with problems in long and/or shortterm memory.
Hyperacuses: GABA damps the propagation of sounds sothat a distinction can be made between the onset ofsound and a background noise.
Restoring the Glutamate to GABA Ratio
1. Limit foods that are precursors of glutamate.
2. Supplement with GABA and theanine.
3. Chelate heavy metals. Toxicity from mercury synergizes
    neuroexcitory effects of glutamate and can damage nerve cells.
4. Avoid excessive copper and maximize the zinc to copper ratio as
    copper inhibits the conversion of glutamate to GABA.
5. Supplement with magnesium maximizing the Mg:Ca ratio, as
    calcium can exacerbate Glutamate toxicity.
6. Maximize methylation to compensate for possible
    CBS upregulation and BHMT deficiency to decrease
    alpha-ketoglutarate production.
Compensate for the Gene Defects
Avoid B6 as it stimulates CBS (the P-5-P form of B6 isless of a problem).  Additional mineral support will beneeded and here we start with Trace MineralsComplex at 4 drops/day
To stimulate SUOX (processing the sulfites)Molybdenum 3 drops twice a day, Boron 3 mg/day,Vitamin E succinate 400 IU/day, and hydroxy-B122,000 mcg/day.
GABA 500 mg 1-2 x daily or more to compensate forthe excessive Glutamate.
Glutathione in increasing amounts (if tolerated it willuse up free sulfur groups).
ilads249.jpg
ilads251.jpg
ilads252.jpg
ilads253.jpg
aspartame-poison.jpg
Outline: The Sensitive Patient and
Lyme Disease Treatment
1.Who are the Sensitive Patients and why are theyimportant?
2.Important historical information that can help identifythese Sensitive Patients.
3.Signs that Sensitive Patients can have on physical exam.
4.Review of the Immune System & HLA-DRB-DQ, and whatit can tell us about the Sensitive Patient.
5.Sensitive Patients can have common genetic factorssuch as: Methylation, KPU/HPL.
6.Sensitive Patients are more likely to have excessExcitotoxins such as: Glutamate:GABA, Histamine,
      Ammonia, and Sulfites.
ilads242.jpg
ilads243.jpg
ilads244.jpg
ilads245.jpg
ilads246.jpg
Sign of KPU/HPL
white-spots-On-Nails.jpg
Krytopyrrole (KPU)
Hydroxy-hemopyrrolin-3-one(HPL)
Metabolic condition that can be turned on
  by trauma or infection resulting in losing zinc
and manganese while storing toxic levels of
copper and heavy metals.
B6 does not get activated to P5P d/t a geneticdefect.
Measure KPU/HPA in urine from Health Diagnosis.
Abnormality in heme synthesis.
Low histamine levels.
Abraham Hoffer implicated this condition in schizophrenia in 1958
ilads250.jpg
KPU/HPL: Symptomatic Presentation
Poor detox patient, sensitive to everything.
Poor dream recall.
Leukodynia (white spots on nails).
High heavy metal levels with difficulty chelating.
Chronic infections that Herx with minimumtreatment.
Zinc, biotin, manganese deficiency.
B6 deficiency.
KPU/HPL - Dietrich Klinghardt’s List
 Familial
 Paranoia / Hallucinations
 Perceptual disorganization
 Obesity
 Course eyebrows
 Knee and joint pain
 B6-responsive anemia
 Stress intolerance
 Emotional liability
 Explosive or episodic anger
 Poor short-term memory
 Crime and delinquency
 Substance abuse
 Attention Deficit / ADHD
 Autism
 Withdrawal
 Abnormal fat distribution
 Poor Dream Recall
 Nail spots (Leukodynia)
 Poor breakfast appetite
 Stretch marks (striae)
 Pale skin, poor tanning
 Acne, allergy
 Constipation
 Eosinophilia
 Light, sound, odor intolerance
 Tremor, shaking, spasms
 Hypoglycemia, glucose intolerance
 Delayed puberty, impotence
 Anxiety / Nervousness
 Pessimism
 Depression
 Cold hands or feet
 Abdominal tenderness
 Mood swings
 Amenorrhea, irregular periods
Zinc Deficiency Symptoms
Mood: Poor dream recall, dysthymic depression, flataffect, lack of motivation, hyperactivity.
Fingernails: White spots on the fingernails, transverselines on the fingernails.
Immune deficiency: get every cold that comes along andhas a prolonged recovery; delayed wound healing.
GI: Poor to loss of appetite (hypochlorhydria and mineraldeficiency that can result), bloating, edema, osteoporosis.
Skin: delayed wound healing, dry skin, dandruff, skinlesion acne, striae and others, rough skin, loose skin (lossof collagen).
MS: Joint pain, degenerative joint and disc disease.
GU: Low libido, delayed puberty, hypogonadism, infertility.
Eye: Macular degeneration.
Oxidative stress and glutathione deficiency.
ilads216.jpg
Vitamin B6 Deficiency
Body Type: Thin, weak, lack of core strength.
Mood: Nervousness, irritable, confusion.
Metabolic: Poor absorption of nutrients, enzymesand co-factors associated with amino acids.
Skin: Dry skin and lesion.
MS: Inflammatory joint pain, muscle weakness,pain and neuropathy.
Neurotransmitters: Deficiencies in dopamine andserotonin.
Oxidative stress: and low level of glutathione.
 
ilads202.jpg
ilads203.jpg
ilads204.jpg
ilads205.jpg
Copper Toxicity
Liver: builds in liver, interferes with estrogenmetabolism, estrogen dominance, PMS,dysmenorrhea.
Mood: Anxious, restless, agitated brain and body,racing thought, intrusive thoughts, physical over-stimulation, ADD, ADHD, depression.
Sleep: Insomnia with unable to turn off thinking.
Neurotransmitters: Increased catecholaminelevels: Epinephrine, Norepinephrine andDopamine.
Copper Toxicity
Acne
Allergies
Hair loss
Anemia
Anorexia
Anxiety
Attention deficit disorder
Arthritis
Asthma
Autism
Candida overgrowth
Depression
Dysmenorrhea
Male infertility
Prostatitis
Fibromyalgia
Migraine Headaches
PMS
Chronic infections
Insomnia
Racing thoughts
Neuralgia (nerve pain)
Sciatica
Hypertension
Hypothyroidism
Schizophrenia
Bipolar (Manic Depression)
ilads247.jpg
Wilson’s Disease (Copper Toxicity)Histapenia (High Copper/Low Histamine)
Wilson’s disease:
Inherited condition.
Inability of the liver to excrete copper throughthe bile system.
Causes neurological disorders including the brainand dementia.
Liver damage.
Histapenia: in orthomolecular medicine is thecondition of high serum copper with lowhistamine.
Copper Deficiency
Copper is an immune system nutrient that canbe depleted in chronic infection and with zincsupplementation.
Fatigue.
Vascular: Varicose veins, hemorrhoids,cardiovascular disease, aneurisms.
General: Hair loss, edema, anorexia.
MS: muscle pain.
High dose Vitamin C mobilizes displacedcopper.
Outline: The Sensitive Patient and
Lyme Disease Treatment
1.Who are the Sensitive Patients and why are theyimportant?
2.Important historical information that can help identifythese Sensitive Patients.
3.Signs that Sensitive Patients can have on physical exam.
4.Review of the Immune System and what it can tell usabout the Sensitive Patient.
5.Sensitive Patients can have common genetic factors suchas: HLA-DRB-DQ, Methylation, KPU/HPL.
6.Sensitive Patients are more likely to have excessExcitotoxins such as: Glutamate:GABA, Histamine,
      Ammonia, and Sulfites
Mast Cell Degranulation & Histamine
mast_cell.jpg
Mast Cell DegranulationHistadelia Type
Excessive histamine can cause additional mucousproduction:
SI: Severe inflammatory GI symptoms resulting inmultiple food allergies and Leaky Gut in the worstcases.
Stomach: Excess stomach acid production (acts as agastric hormone to stimulate flow of HCl).
Lung: Asthma, bronchial secretions.
Head: Vascular headaches, vasomotor rhinitis,excessive saliva, tears, and thin nasal.
Skin: Allergic skin disorders with pruritis, hives.
Porous Mast Cells sandwiched within the fragilemucosal membrane of the small intestine.
Repeated Histamine release is like throwinggas on a fire in the inflamed leaky gut.
Histadelia Symptom Presentation
Results in irritated brain, mucous membranes andparticularly in the gut, causing leaky gut.
Overproduce and retain excessive levels ofhistamine. Histamine is a substance in the bodythat has wide ranging effects.
There are receptors for histamine in the brain,stomach, skin, lungs, mucus membranes, bloodvessels, etc. For some individuals, high levels ofblood histamine (called histadelia) havepsychological, behavioral, and cognitivesymptoms.
Orthomolecular Characteristicsof the Histadelia Type
Lab Values: Carl Pfeiffer characterized this psychiatricdisorder that besides the high whole blood levels ofhistamine, also has low serotonin, dopamine,norepinephrine and elevated basophiles.
Psychiatric Conditions: Symptomatically the extremelyhigh histamine patients have been diagnosed asschizophrenics. These severe cases can involve psychosiswith delusional thinking rather than hallucinations. Theyappear outwardly calm but suffer from extreme internalanxiety. They speak very little and may sit motionless forextended periods.
Mucosal membrane: seasonal allergies.
General: OCD tendencies, perfectionism, high libido,sparse body hair.
More Orthomolecular Characteristicsof the Histadelia Type
Can speed up metabolism resulting in hyperactivity.
Highly motivated and work compulsively.
Hard driving personalities. Insomnia.
They can be highly creative.
Strong sexual desire.
Poor tolerance to heat (good with cold).
Poor pain tolerance, muscle, joint pain, and stiffness.
Unexplained nausea.
Excessive perspiration and warm skin.
Histadelics often have long fingers and toes.
ilads233.jpg
ilads235.jpg
ilads234.jpg
ilads236.jpg
ilads237.jpg
ilads238.jpg
ilads239.jpg
ilads240.jpg
ilads241.jpg
Mast Cells Release their HistamineGranules with the Slightest Provocation:Treatment Stabilize Mast Cells
mast_cell2.gif
Treatment of High Histamine
Treatment for Mast Cell Degranulation:
Ketotifen is a second-generation H1-antihistamine and mastcell stabilizer
Target dose 1-2 mg before meals and before bed. Initiallysedative and should be used at night. The fatigue, that iscommon to this class of antihistamines, is quicklyhabituated (usually 7 -10 days).  Dose can be started beforemeals. (Clark’s Pharmacy, Bellevue, WA).
Treatment for Orthomolecular approach:
The amino acid Methionine when supplemented lowersblood levels of histamine by increasing histaminebreakdown.
Low-protein, high complex carbohydrate diet.
Histidine, which is more common in animal proteins, shouldbe avoided as it can be converted in histamine.
Our Better Understanding of Life’sInterconnectedness Will Help Us As Physicians
interconnectedlife54f1a6a2c8833-800wi.jpg
Unlock the Mysteries of the Sensitive Patient.
As Physicians We Are Challenged Every Day To Perfect and Expand Our Craft.
LifeScience.jpg
ILADS Boston 2012
© 2012 Wayne Anderson ND
All Rights Reserved
wayneanderson.com