November 2, 2012
Ann F Corson MD
1
The Treatment of TBDin the
Pregnant andPediatric Patient
Handouts
 Everyone should have received:
Tessa Gardner’s chapter (two parts)
Dr. Jones’ and Edna Gibbs’ live birth data
Dr. Jones’ WB explanation
Appendices to lecture in powerpoint
1. Antibiotic dosing in pediatric patients
2. Dr. Jones tx caveats
3. Caveats
4. Signs and symptoms overview
5. Prevention
November 2, 2012
Ann F Corson MD
2
May 18, 2012
Ann F. Corson, MD
3
Borrelia Biofilms
Biofilms of Borrelia burgdorferiand Clinical Implication forChronic Borreliosis”
  Alan B MacDonald, MD
  Presentation July 7, 2008
   University of New Haven, CO
BbBiofilm2.tiff
May 18, 2012
Ann F. Corson, MD
4
Borrelia Biofilms
Eva Sapi PhD and AlanMacDonald MD
Biofilms of Borreliaburgdorferi in ChronicCutaneous Borreliosis
American Journal of ClinicalPathology AJCP-2008-01-0002
BbBiofilm.tiff
Borrelia Biofilms
Eisendle et al., Focus FloatingMicroscopy Gold Standard forCutaneous Borreliosis? AmericanJournal of Clinical Pathology 2007;127(2): 213-222
Eisendle et al., Morphea, amanifestation of infection withBorrelia species. British Journal ofDermatology 2007; 157:1189-1198
Eisendle et al., The expandingspectrum of cutaneous Borreliosis.Giornale Italiano di Dermatologia eVenereologia 2009; 144:157-171
May 18, 2012
Ann F. Corson, MD
5
Am J Clin Pathol 2007;127:213-222, 219
April 22, 2010
Ann F Corson MD
6
TBD patient complexity
Biofilms are everywhere
Gastrointestinal tract – mouth to anus
Sinuses -MARCoNS
Respiratory epithelium
Skin – chronic sores
Synovial membranes, bone marrow, brain, anyand all tissues
Blood
March 19, 2011
Ann F. Corson, MD
7
Biofilms
Snapshot 2011-02-09 20-20-04
18
March 19, 2011
Ann F. Corson, MD
8
Biofilms
Snapshot my biofilm.tiff
Snapshot Joe's biofilm.tiff
March 19, 2011
Ann F. Corson, MD
9
Biofilms
ROWpost.jpg
ROWpre.jpg
Protomyxzoa Biofilms
May 18, 2012
Ann F. Corson, MD
10
scan0004 - Version 2.jpg
Protomyxzoa Biofilms
May 18, 2012
Ann F. Corson, MD
11
scan0017 2.jpg
April 22, 2010
Ann F Corson MD
12
TBD patient complexity
Polymicrobial biofilms of all organ systems
Gut dysbiosis
Fungal dominance
Parasites
Systemic inflammation
Need for immune modulators
Hypercoagulability
Need for fibrinolytics, SQ heparin
April 22, 2010
Ann F Corson MD
13
TBD patient complexity
Immune system dysfunction
Anergy and/or confusion of gastrointestinal(GALT) and/or mucocutaneous (MALT)associated lymphoid tissue
Th1/Th2 balance
Allergic up regulation
Environmental
Food
MCS
Autoimmunity
April 22, 2010
Ann F Corson MD
14
TBD patient complexity
Biotoxin illness – MOLD!
Genetic predisposition
Leptin and Pro-opiomelanocortin system disruption
Kryptopyrroluria/Hemopyrrolactamuria
Supra-physiological loss of Zinc, Manganese,Magnesium, B-6 and others
Liver detoxification faults
Genetic mutations, e.g. MTHFR
Decreased methylation, BH4, increased ammonia,homocysteine, sulfation defects
Acquired, e.g. gut dysbiosis, toxins, infections
April 22, 2010
Ann F Corson MD
15
TBD patient complexity
Mitochondrial dysfunction
Infection, drug or nutritionally induced
Toxic encumbered matrix
Immune system debris such as Ag:Ab complexes
Heavy metals and other pollutants
Polymicrobial biofilms of all organ systems
November 2, 2012
Ann F Corson MD
16
Bell’s palsy - resolved
scan0007
scan0008
Left:
May 2007
      Right:
May 2009
May 18, 2012
Evaluation of TBD patient
History
Family history
Biological parents, siblings
Family dynamics/nuclear family arrangements
Social history
Nutritional habits
Mold in home, school, work environments
EMFs in home, school, work environments
Pets, past (mother’s pets) and present
Travel history
Ann F. Corson, MD
17
May 18, 2012
Evaluation of TBD patient
History
Risk factors for TBD
Domiciles
Travel
Complete medical history
Detailed history from conception to present
History of present illness
Review of symptoms
Trauma history (physical and emotional)
Surgical, dental, manipulative procedures
Ann F. Corson, MD
18
May 18, 2012
Evaluation of TBD patient
Physical examination
Laboratory evaluation
TBD labs
Igenex, Fry Labs, MDL, Advanced Lab Service,LabCorp CD57
Medical work up
CBC diff, CMP, UA
DetoxiGenomics (Genovations)
HLA typing LabCorp (biotoxin illness)
Autoimmunity
Hypercoagulability
Ann F. Corson, MD
19
May 18, 2012
Evaluation of TBD patient
Laboratory evaluation, cont.
Hormonal evaluation
Thyroid, adrenal, gonadal
Food allergy assessment
IgG vs. ELISA Act
Stool analysis - CDSA
Heavy metal challenge
KPU testing
Home, school, work analysis for mold, toxins
ERMI
Ann F. Corson, MD
20
Pregnancy - management
Maternal health and treatment
Nutrition
Organic diet - limit sugars and grains
Anti-inflammation diet
Gut health
Starts in mouth
Teeth care, floss, non-toxic toothpastes, noaggressive cleaning or amalgam work whilepregnant or nursing
Keep bowels moving
Support liver/GB, probiotics
November 2, 2012
Ann F Corson MD
21
Pregnancy - management
Maternal health and treatment, cont.
Supplements
MVI for pregnancy
Rx brands not always best
DHA – most important EFA
B-vitamins, folate
Check MTHFR gene analysis
Trace minerals
Mitochondrial resuscitation
Researched Nutritionals’ ATP fuel
November 2, 2012
Ann F Corson MD
22
Pregnancy - management
Maternal health and treatment, cont.
Limit maternal toxic exposure
Mold, other environmental toxins
Skin, hair, nail products
Drainage and regulation medicines
Pekana, Nutramedix, Energetix
Antimicrobial treatment entire pregnancy
Azithromycin 600 mg daily
Cell wall antibiotic
Amoxicillin, cephalosporin (Ceftin, Omnicef)
November 2, 2012
Ann F Corson MD
23
Pregnancy - management
Maternal health, cont.
Safe in pregnancy: PCN, cephalosporins,azithromycin, atovaquone
Not safe in pregnancy: quinolones,clarithromycin, tetracyclines, metronidazole,trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole
Herbals in pregnancy
Check with each individual company
Chrysanthemum – Vital Guard SupremeSupreme Nutrition
November 2, 2012
Ann F Corson MD
24
Breast Feeding
Continue antimicrobial and supplements
Replace azithromycin?
Continue to limit toxic exposures
Treating mother can treat baby
November 2, 2012
Ann F Corson MD
25
Testing at birth
Cord Blood
Advanced Labs Borrelia culture
Fry Labs smears (both) and PCR FL1953
Igenex PCRs for TBDs
PCRs for other infectious organisms
EBV, HHV-6, Parvo, Chlamydia, Mycoplasma
Baby’s urine for Bb PCR
Foreskin (if circumcised) for Bb PCR
Serologies not helpful
November 2, 2012
Ann F Corson MD
26
Initial infant evaluation
History
Labor and delivery
Apgars, temperature and glucose control,jaundice, breast or bottle
Immunizations
Feeding, sleeping, voiding, stooling patterns
Physical examination
Birth marks, cry, skin color and temp, muscletone, skin infections (cradle cap, diaper rash),suck, grasp, hip click, red light reflex, defects
November 2, 2012
Ann F Corson MD
27
Subsequent infant evaluation
Sequential examinations bimonthly
Follow baby’s urine for Bb PCR monthly forfirst 6-12 months
Again, serologies not helpful until after about6 months
Follow for normal growth and developmentalstages – best thing you can do for baby iskeep mother healthy!
November 2, 2012
Ann F Corson MD
28
Pediatric history taking
Maternal health at time conception andthroughout pregnancy.
SVD versus C-section
Coming through birth canal gives babyexposure to good and maybe bad pathogens
Neonatal issues
Elevated bilirubin, glucose and temperatureregulation
Traumas, illnesses in first 12 weeks life
November 2, 2012
Ann F Corson MD
29
Pediatric history taking
First year of life – or from birth until walking
 illness, injuries, surgeries
Toddlerhood – from walking to starting school
Illness, injuries, surgeries
Elementary school
Illness, injuries, surgeries
Middle school
Illness, injuries, surgeries
High school…..
November 2, 2012
Ann F Corson MD
30
November 2, 2012
Ann F Corson MD
31
ASD at 15 mos. - ? at age 44 mos.
scan
Hunter2
November 2, 2012
Ann F Corson MD
32
Treatment caveats
Treatment lasts as long as is necessary
Until children are completely symptom free forseveral months
No recurrence of Lyme symptoms withconcomitant illnesses or stresses
Sickest children may need many months ofany combination of: IV, IM and/or oralantibiotics, herbals and homeopathic therapies
Children whose diagnosis and treatment aredelayed may suffer permanent neurologicaland physical impairment
April 22, 2010
Ann F Corson MD
33
German Biological Medicine treatment principles
Restore vitality
Rebuild vital heat and energy
Restore health and function of matrix
Clear toxicity, hypercoagulability, biofilms,infections, scars, restoring communication andfluidity throughout extracellular matrix
Restore metabolic function of
Intestine, liver, kidney, bone marrow
Restore regulatory function to
Neuro-immune, neuro-endocrine and vascularsystems
Treatment - management
Vaccinations
Delay several months, one at a time
Preservative free – single use vial
Prevent reactions
Homeopathics (Thuja)
Phosphatidyl serine pre and post
Vaccine resources:
National Vaccine Information Center -http://www.nvic.org
November 2, 2012
Ann F Corson MD
34
Treatment - management
November 2, 2012
Ann F Corson MD
35
May 18, 2012
TBD treatment and patientresponsibilities
Tick avoidance
Toxin avoidance in home, work, school andautomobile
Chemicals are everywhere
Household cleaners, personal care products of allkinds including toothpastes, soaps, shampoos, hairdyes, nail polish, lotions, cosmetics, cigarettesmoking, alcohol, non organic and processedfoods, water, air
Ann F. Corson, MD
36
April 22, 2010
Ann F Corson MD
37
MOLD! Biotoxin illness!
Ritchie Shoemaker MD
Public Health Alert August 2011
Gordon Medical Assoc. DVD 10/22-23/2011
Accurate mold evaluations
Remediation – beware – retest!
May 18, 2012
TBD treatment and patientresponsibilities
Clean air
Purifiers
Clean water
www.mercola.com - water testing
Deluxe test kits for city and well water
Proper pH – 8.0 best
Drinking bottles
HDPE, stainless steel or glass only
NO single-use PET or polycarbonate bottles
Allows growth of biofilms, leach xenoestrogens
Ann F. Corson, MD
38
May 18, 2012
TBD treatment and patientresponsibilities - diet
Dietary compliance is of utmost importance
Paleolithic oligoantigenic principles
Fully organic
Grass fed meats, free range poultry, wild fish
No processed food, no GMO, no HFCS
Limit sugar to fresh fruit, no dried/frozen fruit
Limit grains of all kinds
Often need to avoid gluten, dairy
Food allergies, common and shifting
Elisa Act test most useful test
Ann F. Corson, MD
39
May 18, 2012
TBD treatment and patientresponsibilities - diet
Dietary compliance is of utmost importance, cont.
GAPS diet – always start with Introduction Diet
Gut health and repair of gut dysbiosis is of utmostimportance and is responsibility of both healthcare professional and parent/patient alike
Ann F. Corson, MD
40
May 18, 2012
TBD treatment and patientresponsibilities - diet
NO HFCS
No dried fruit
Limit sugar to fresh fruit
Fructose’s bad effects:
Activates fat deposition
Insulin and leptin resistance
Blocks saiety signals
As addictive as narcotics
Creates oxidative stress
 
Ann F. Corson, MD
41
IMG_1223.jpg
May 18, 2012
TBD treatment and patientresponsibilities
Compliance with treatment protocols
Antimicrobials
Herbals, spagyric homeopathics, others
Beyond Balance, Supreme Nutrition, Nutramedix,BWFs, Pekana, Energetix
Allopathic antibiotics, antivirals, antifungals,antiparasitics
Drainage medicines: liver/GB, lymph, kidney, etc.
Supplement with at least:
DHA essential fatty acids, MVI with trace minerals,activated B vitamins, magnesium (Epsom saltbaths)
Ann F. Corson, MD
42
May 18, 2012
TBD treatment and patientresponsibilities
Herbal antimicrobials
Borrelia sp.
Bb-1 Beyond Balance
A-L Complex ByronWhiteFormulas
Samento, Banderal, others Nutramedix
Vital Guard Supreme Supreme Nutrition
Morinda Supreme (noni) Supreme Nutrition
Babesia microti
MC-Bab-1 Beyond Balance
A-Bab BWFs
Mora, Enula Nutramedix
Ann F. Corson, MD
43
May 18, 2012
TBD treatment and patientresponsibilities
Herbal antimicrobials
Babesia duncani
MC-Bab-2 Beyond Balance
A-Bab BWFs
Protomyxzoa rheumatica
MC-Bab-2 Beyond Balance
A-Bab BWFs
Cumanda Nutramedix
Golden Thread Supreme Supreme Nutrition
Ann F. Corson, MD
44
May 18, 2012
TBD treatment and patientresponsibilities
Herbal antimicrobials
Bartonella sp.
MC-Bar-1, MC-IMN-R Beyond Balance
A-Bart BWFs
Houtuynia, others  Nutramedix
Mycoplasma sp.
Melia Supreme Supreme Nutrition (neem)
Viruses
A-EB/H6, A-V BWFs
MC-IMN-V Beyond Balance
Echina-V Energetix
Ann F. Corson, MD
45
May 18, 2012
TBD treatment and patientresponsibilities
Cranial Osteopathy
   .com
William Sutherland, DO
Primary Respiratory
    Mechanism, PRM
Ann F. Corson, MD
46
Cover - OCF.pdf
May 18, 2012
TBD treatment and patientresponsibilities
Acupuncture
Stereomicroscopic
     image of meridian
                   http://www.acupuncturetoday.com/mpacms/at/article.php?id=31918
EMF reduction
www.mercola.com search EMF
www.emfrelief.com
Ann F. Corson, MD
47
Snapshot 2011-02-05 14-10-18.tiff
May 18, 2012
TBD patient responsibilities -toxins
Toxic heavy metals
Amalgam removal by biological dentist -www.iabdm.org
41PstopDXWL._SL500_AA300_.jpg
Ann F. Corson, MD
48
Appendix 1Pediatric antibiotic dosing
Amoxicillin 50-100 mg/kg BID e.g. 400 BID for 2-3 y/o
Bicillin 1.2 million units IM weekly in over 7-8 y/o,up to twice weekly, depending on size of buttocks(limiting factor in using Bicillin is size of buttocksmuscles) using 3/4 needles
Omnicef 125-250 mg BID up to 100 lbs
Cedax under 8 y/o 90 mg BID, over 8 y/o up to180 mg BID
Ceftin 125-250 mg BID up to 100 lbs
Appendix 1 – Dr. Jones’Pediatric antibiotic dosing
Ketek 400 mg 6 y/o and up  (Ive given it as youngas 4y/o with excellent results) Get EKG before and3-4 days after starting treatment check PR interval
Zithromax 100 mg  to 250 mg BID
Biaxin 125-250 mg BID  Careful: Biaxin can causepsychosis
tinidazole can be given as young as 1-2 y/o at 125mg BID, older 250 mg BID (2 consecutive days/wk)
Flagyl 125 mg BID 1-3 y/o, older 250 mg BID
Rifampin, ask pharmacist to make suspension 30mg/ml.  Dose at 10-20 mg/kg up to 600 mg daily
Appendix 1 – Dr. Jones’Pediatric antibiotic dosing
Plaquenil 100-200 mg BID, especially if 31 or 39kDa bands present as these often associated withhigh degree of autoimmunity. (I also use Plaquenil ifa lot of joint pain is present due to its anti-inflammatory as well as anti-Borrelia effects)
Mepron, use highest dose tolerated 1/2 to 1 tsp BID
Minocin or doxycycline over 8y/o use 50-100 BID(I have pushed Minocin to 300 mg/day in 9-12y/o)Minocin can cause increased ICP with papilledema(PTC), especially in peri-pubescent girls)
Appendix 1 – Dr. Jones’Pediatric antibiotic dosing
Ciprofloxacin 250 - 500 mg BID.  Ciprofloxacin oftentolerated as young as 12 y/o.  (I have used it asyoung as 8 y/o successfully)
Cannot use Levaquin or Avalox in children as theyhave more tendon/muscle problems than adults
Cholestyramine resin dosing in under 100 lbs orunder 12 y/o give 60 mg/kg per dose
“Sleepers to use in kids: Benadryl, chloral hydrate,Sonata (over 6 y/o), benzodiazepines, melatonincream or spray
Appendix 1 – Dr. Jones’Pediatric antibiotic dosing
IV Rocephin 75 mg/kg up to 2 gm QD
IV Zithromax 200-400 mg QD in over 12 y/o
IV doxycycline rarely used by Dr. Jones in kids
IV Claforan 100 m/kg up to 2 gm/dose BID (cansuppress bone marrow causing decrease inWBC and RBC)
IV Primaxin OK in kids, crosses BBB better thanPCN
Appendix 2 – Dr. Jones’Pediatric dosing caveats
For Ehrlichia: in kids under 8 y/o use 1-4 wks ofdoxycycline 1/2 tsp BID
For Bartonella: in children under 8 y/o use rifampinand Bactrim together for 1 wk to 3 months.  Also useBactrim and Zithromax or Rifampin and Zithromax
For Borrelia: Zithromax and rifampin often good incombination, e.g. for 85 lb 10 y/o dose would berifampin 150 mg BID and Zithromax 250 mg BID
For Borrelia: Zithromax (intracellular) andcephalosporin or PCN (CWAbx) in combination
For Mycoplasama fermentans: Rifampin andZithromax or Bactrim and Zithromax
Appendix 2 – Dr. Jones’Pediatric dosing caveats
For autism symptoms: Flagyl and Zithromaxoften good in combination
For neurological tics: clonidine 0.1 mg QD
With unrelenting HA and paresthesias thinkBabesia co-infection
Safe in pregnancy: PCN, cephalosporins,Zithromax, Mepron
Not safe in pregnancy: quinolones, Biaxin,tetracyclyines, Flagyl, Bactrim
Appendix 2 – Dr. Jones’Pediatric dosing caveats
Dr. Jones has treated children with anywhere from 3months to 10 years of continuous antibiotics.  He doesnot pulse treatment, but always uses continuousantibiotic therapy.  Duration of treatment is based onthe childs symptoms.  Continue antibiotics for a full 2months after all symptoms have resolved, and untilthere is no recurrence of Lyme symptoms withconcurrent infections, injury/trauma, surgery,emotional trauma or menses.  Also treat until the childhim/herself feels that the Lyme bugs are gone.
         Always ask the child what he/she thinks!
November 2, 2012
Ann F Corson MD
57
Appendix 3Caveats
Any child who becomes ill after a tick biteneeds a full evaluation for the presence of co-infections
Any child who becomes ill after a tick bite whowas treated with 3 to 4 weeks of oralantibiotics has most likely been inadequatelytreated
Initial inadequate treatment makes futuretreatment more difficult
November 2, 2012
Ann F Corson MD
58
Appendix 3Caveats
Neurological and/or neuropsychiatric signsand symptoms are often the first and onlypresenting sign of infection
Neurological and/or neuropsychiatric signsand symptoms are often the most commonindication of persistent infection afterinadequate treatment
April 2, 2011
Ann F Corson MD
59
Appendix 4Identifying TBD children
Lyme is truly the Great Imitator of our timesjust as syphilis was for prior generations
Onset of the illness can be abrupt or indolent
All organ systems of the body can be affected
Symptoms are often vague and shifting from dayto day therefore many children are thought to bemalingerers or be emotionally disturbed
Children often dont understand what ishappening to their bodies and have a hard timeexplaining often unusual or bizarre symptoms
April 2, 2011
Ann F Corson MD
60
Appendix 4Identifying signs and symptoms
How does Lyme disease present?
Flu-like illness at any time of the year
Fatigue, often unrelieved by rest
Unexplained fevers, often cyclical
Headaches of all kinds
Frequent infections: viral, bacterial and/orfungal
Recurrent swollen lymph nodes
Recurrent sore throats
Chest pains, shortness of breath, dry cough
April 2, 2011
Ann F Corson MD
61
Appendix 4Identifying signs and symptoms
How does Lyme disease present?
Abdominal pain of all kinds
Changes in appetite
Irritable bowel symptoms with changes instooling patterns
Joint pains, migratory and intermittent
Deep bone pains
Myalgias, muscle spasms and twitches
Urinary urgency and frequency, dysuria,incontinence
April 2, 2011
Ann F Corson MD
62
Appendix 4Identifying signs and symptoms
 How does Lyme disease present?
Rashes of all kinds that come and go
New onset neurological and/or psychiatricsymptoms
Sleep disturbances
New onset aerobic exercise intolerance
Dark circles under the eyes
Intermittent red, hot pinnae
Increased allergies and chemical sensitivities
April 2, 2011
Ann F Corson MD
63
Appendix 4Identifying signs and symptoms
Caveats:
Less than 50% of children with Lyme diseaseremember a tick bite.
Even less remember an EM rash.
EM rash has highly variable appearance
April 2, 2011
Ann F Corson MD
64
Appendix 4In depth signs and symptoms
Neurological symptoms
90% of children have a deterioration in schoolperformance due to cognitive dysfunction
Difficulty with concentration and attention
Easy distractibility, often labeled as ADD
Word and name retrieval problems
Short term memory difficulties
Decreased reading comprehension
Impaired speech fluency
Dyslexic-like errors
Loss of mathematical skills
April 2, 2011
Ann F Corson MD
65
Appendix 4In depth signs and symptoms
Neurological symptoms, continued
Children with TBD disease demonstratedefects in auditory and visual sequentialprocessing
     Tager, Fallon et al. A Controlled Study of CognitiveDeficits in Children With Chronic Lyme Disease. TheJournal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences2001; 13:500-507.
    Bloom, Steere et al. Neurocognitive abnormalities inchildren after classic manifestations of Lyme disease.Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal 1998;17(3):189-196.
April 2, 2011
Ann F Corson MD
66
Appendix 4In depth signs and symptoms
Neurological symptoms, continued
Encephalopathy, confusional states
Headaches of all kinds
Sensory hypersensitivity to noise, light, odors,touch
Poor balance and coordination
Gait abnormalities
Loss of previously acquired motor skills
Movement disorders: spasticity, ataxia
Motor or vocal tics
Convergence and visual tracking problems
April 2, 2011
Ann F Corson MD
67
Appendix 4In depth signs and symptoms
Neurological symptoms, continued
Spinal cord myelopathies
Radiculopathies: Bannwarths syndrome
Peripheral neuropathies: paresthesias, subtleweakness, mild to severely painful
Cranial neuropathies: Bells Palsy, opticneuritis, hearing or swallowing difficulties
Autonomic dysfunction: Pots syndrome
Partial complex seizures, grand mal seizures
Pseudo tumor cerebri
April 2, 2011
Ann F Corson MD
68
Appendix 4In depth signs and symptoms
Psychiatric Symptoms
Uncharacteristic behavior outbursts, moodswings, irritability, emotional lability
Social withdrawal, decreased participation inactivities
Depression
Suicidal thoughts in over 40%
Rage and anger management disorders
Anxiety disorders, panic attacks
Depersonalization
April 2, 2011
Ann F Corson MD
69
Appendix 4In depth signs and symptoms
Psychiatric Symptoms, cont.
Oppositional behaviors
Frustration intolerance
Obsessive compulsive disorders
Hallucinations of all kinds
Psychosis
Personality changes
Self-mutilating behaviors
April 2, 2011
Ann F Corson MD
70
 Appendix 4Special age groups s/s
Adolescents
Parents and teachers may think any unusualbehaviors are just normal adolescence orproblems such as illicit drug use or new onsetpsychiatric disorder
Mood swings, oppositional behaviors, anxiety,depression
Self mutilating behaviors
Teenagers often do not report to or showparents problems with their bodies
April 2, 2011
Ann F Corson MD
71
 Appendix 4Special age groups s/s
 Adolescents, cont.
Teens can also turn to alcohol and illicit drugsas self medication
Teenage girls may have pelvic pain ormenstrual problems, ovarian cysts, boys mayhave testicular pain
Teens need to be aware that Borrelia may besexually transmitted and that a fetus canacquire the infection from the mother duringpregnancy
April 2, 2011
Ann F Corson MD
72
 Appendix 4Special age groups s/s
Pre-schoolers and toddlers
Mood swings, sudden emotional outbursts
Irritability
Personality changes
Return of separation anxiety
New phobias
Regression of motor and social skills (loss ofdevelopmental milestones)
Changes in play behavior, tire easily, lessactive
April 2, 2011
Ann F Corson MD
73
 Appendix 4Special age groups s/s
 Pre-schoolers and toddlers, cont.
Trouble falling asleep, frequent awakenings
Nightmares, night terrors, sleep walking
Diaper rash unresponsive to normal treatment
Return to bedwetting or loss daytime bladdercontrol after being dry
Frequent URIs, ear and throat infections,bronchitis, pneumonia
April 2, 2011
Ann F Corson MD
74
Appendix 4Co-infections
Co-infections are the rule, not the exception
80% of my pediatric patients co-infected
Co-infections often best diagnosed clinically
Co-infected patients are:
Sicker
More likely to have failed prior treatment
Require longer treatment with multiple agents
Co-infections must be eradicated or Borreliainfection will persist
April 2, 2011
Ann F Corson MD
75
Appendix 4Signs and symptoms of co-infections
Babesia species:
High fever with initial infection, later cyclicalfevers
Night sweats or chills (come in clusters in 1-2week cycles)
Profound fatigue
Headache
Myalgias
Deep bone pains (especially of the distalextremities)
April 2, 2011
Ann F Corson MD
76
Appendix 4Signs and symptoms of co-infections
Babesia species, continued:
SOB, dry cough, chest pain
Painful soles of feet
Poor balance
Severe brain fog/encephalitis
Anxiety, panic attacks
Chronic low grade anemia, elevated ferritin
April 2, 2011
Ann F Corson MD
77
Appendix 4Signs and symptoms of co-infections
Bartonella henselae:
Fatigue
Insomnia
Headache
Abdominal pain
Lymph node enlargement
Transient soreness of soles of feet uponstanding first thing in the morning
April 2, 2011
Ann F Corson MD
78
Appendix 4Signs and symptoms of co-infections
Bartonella henselae, continued:
Neurological symptoms
Resistant radiculopathies
New onset seizure disorder
Acute encephalitis, disorientation, memory loss
Ataxia, tremors
Psychiatric disorders of all kinds
Rage attacks, anger
Cutting behavior
April 2, 2011
Ann F Corson MD
79
Appendix 4Signs and symptoms of co-infections
Bartonella henselae, continued:
Subcutaneous nodules (shins, thighs)
Rashes
Stretch marks
Acne like eruptions
November 2, 2012
Ann F Corson MD
80
Appendix 4Needs of sick children
Social impact
Symptoms fluctuate so friends, family andteachers often dont believe the sick child
Isolation
Loss of peer group and normal socialization
Loss of academic work
Loss of self-esteem
November 2, 2012
Ann F Corson MD
81
Appendix 4Needs of sick children
Physical impact
Children feel sick, they hurt, their brains dontwork
Inability to participate in sports or otherextracurricular activities
Family impact
Interruption of normal family life, stress onworking parents and siblings
November 2, 2012
Ann F Corson MD
82
Appendix 4What can schools do?
Children with persistent neuroborreliosis need
Appropriate medical, psychological andeducational assistance
Allow for individual educations plans
Late arrivals, early dismissals
Flexibility in assignment due dates
Removing time limits from test taking
Allow course auditing or changes
Tutor support at school or home (on-line)
November 2, 2012
Ann F Corson MD
83
Appendix 4What can parents do?
Make sure schools are abiding by the twoFederal laws that protect students with Lymedisease and supercede state codes andregulations:
IDEA: Individuals with Disabilities EducationAct  www.ideapractices.org
Section 504 of the 1973 Rehabilitation Actwww.504idea.org
November 2, 2012
Ann F Corson MD
84
Appendix 5Prevention
Avoid exposure to tick habitats
Damp, shade, edges, wood, rocks,  tall grass
Clear away underbrush, cut back shrubbery
Wood chip boundary, play set location
Get the deer out of your yard
Fences, repellants
Spray with natural or synthetic insecticides
Timed spring and fall
Damminix® or Maxforce® for mice
Kill larval and nymphal ticks
November 2, 2012
Ann F Corson MD
85
Appendix 5Prevention
Wear protective clothing
Shirts and pants tucked in, hats, permethrin-impregnated
Use appropriate insecticides while outdoors
DEET
Treat tick exposed domestic animals withtopical insecticides regularly
Lobby local government regarding tick anddeer control and elimination
November 2, 2012
Ann F Corson MD
86
Lyme synovitis – before Syntrions
Lyme knees
November 2, 2012
Ann F Corson MD
87
    Lyme synovitis – after Syntrions
SyI creams