Antibiotic sensitivity of Borreliaburgdorferi biofilm
Eva Sapi Ph.D.
University of New Haven
Borrelia burgdorferi the spirochete thatcauses Lyme disease
In 1982, the etiologic agent ofLyme disease was discovered byWilly Burgdorfer who isolatedspirochetes belonging to thegenus Borrelia from the mid-gutsof Ixodes ticks.
He showed that thesespirochetes reacted with immuneserum from patients that hadbeen diagnosed with Lymedisease. Subsequently, theetiologic agent was given thename Borrelia burgdorferi.
Borrelia burgdorferi , FA stain (CDC)
Borrelia burgdorferi (B31) genome
Has a chromosome of 910,725 base pairs, with at least17 linear and circular plasmids with a combined size ofmore than 533,000 base pairs.
Both the linear chromosome and escort of plasmids of B.burgdorferi have been recently sequenced
 
The main chromosome of B. burgdorferi is estimated tocontain 853 genes that encode a basic set of proteins
To test for Borrelia susceptibility toantibiotics: MIC and MBC
Minimal inhibitory concentration =MIC is generally consideredthe drug concentration at which no motile organisms areobserved by dark-field microscopy after 48-72 h of incubationwith antibiotics in BSK-H medium at 32-33oC
Agger et al 1992; Levin et al 1993
Minimal bactericidal concentration= MBC was defined as thelowest concentration of antibiotics at which no viablespirochetes could be detected after 2-3 weeks of subcultivationin BSK-H medium, free of antibiotics at 32-33°C
Agger et al 1992; Sicklinger et al 2003
Standardized method to test antimicrobialsusceptibility against pathogenic spirochetes
B. burgdorferi isolates were added to modified BSKmedium containing each antibacterial agent to aconcentration of 10-107 organisms per ml.
After 24, 48, 72, and 96 h of incubation at 32°C, thenumber of motile spirochetes can determined by using aPetroff-Hausser chamber, and the percentage of killingwas calculated as follows:
% viability = (number of motile spirochetes/motile organisms ininitial inoculum) x 100Agger et al 1992
National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards. 1990.Methods for dilution antimicrobial susceptibility tests for bacteriathat grow aerobically, 2nd ed. M7-A2. National Committee for Clinical LaboratoryStandards, Villanova, Pa
In vitro studies for different genospecies/species ofBorrelia – MBCs (microgram/ml)
Doxycycline: 0.25-25.0
Penicillin 0.15-6.5
Azitromycin: 0.015-2.0
Erythromycin  0.06->0.5
Clarithromycin0.06-0.5
Telitromycin0.002-0.03
Amoxicillin: 0.4-8.00
Ceftriaxone: 0.03-2.00*
Ciproflaxin0.5-16.0
Tigecycline 0.05-0.19
Russel et al 1987, Agger et al 1992; Dever et al 1992, Levin at all1993; Sicklinger et al 2003, Hunfeld et al 2004, 2005*, Kim et al2006, Yang et al 2009, Brorson et al 2009
In vitro and clinical data – do they agree?
Survival of Borrelia burgdorferi in antibiotically treated patients withLyme borreliosis “ Preac-Mursic et al 1989
“In vitro results have no proven correlation with antimicrobial clinicaleffectiveness in vivo  since the relationship of MICs or MBCs ofdrugs against slowly dividing organisms such as B. burgdorferi”
Moody et al 1994
Culture positive and PCR positive blood after antibiotics therapy”Oksi et al 1999
“Clinically treatment failures occur in 5 to 10% of EM patients (oraldoxycycline or amoxicillin for 14 to 30 days)” Smith et al 2002
But how about the in vivo studies?
Treatment with oxytetracycline, erythromycin ordoxycycline in mice failed to eradicate acute Borreliainfection or ameliorate the disease. Moody et al 1994
Chloramphenicol and azithromycin failed to eradicate theorganism but ameliorated the disease. Moody et al 1994
In a dog model of infection, showed that antibiotic-treated dogs (doxycycline and amoxicilllin, 30 days)continued to have persistent Borrelia-specific DNA intheir tissue albeit at lower levels than observed inuntreated animals. Straubinger et al 1997
But how about Ceftriaxone (Rocephin)?
Bockenstedt LK, Mao J, Hodzic E et al.
Detection of attenuated, noninfectious spirochetes in Borreliaburgdorferi-infected mice after antibiotic treatment. J InfectDis 2002; 186: 1430–7.
Hodzic E, Feng S, Holden K et al.
Persistence of Borrelia burgdorferi following antibiotic treatmentin mice. Antimicrob Agents Chemother 2008; 52: 1728–36.
SUMMARY: A low numbers of noncultivable spirochetesdetected by PCR following antibiotictreatment. For at least 3 months after cessation of antibiotic, these noncultivable forms can beacquired by ticks (xenodiagnosis), transmitted by ticks, survive the molts between larvae tonymphs to adults, infect recipient mice by tissue transplant, transcribe RNA, and express antigen inticks and tissues in the form of morphologically identifiable spirochetes
The different forms of Borrelia
Borrelia burgdorferi canconvert between cyst,non-motile and normalmotile spirochete forms.
The cystic forms areresistant to mostantibiotic treatmentsand difficult to detect inthe body.
http://www.lymeinfo.net/medical/LDAdverseConditions.pdf
New York State Department of Health
The most recognized forms of Borreliaburgdorferi
Spirochetes
Round bodies (cysts, granules)
L-forms
Biofilm
http://hubpages.com/
C:\Users\Yram\AppData\Local\Temp\DEV4_DEV6_2010_03_18_000215_dluec1_40X_DAPI-FITC-TxRed_ESN042_T1_R1_baclight stain of Bb_discard.jpg
Photo by David Leucke
C:\Users\Yram\Downloads\Untitled-1.jpg
A. MacDonald, 2006
Can all those forms be infective and
can they revert back to spirochetes?
Do we need to eliminate all those different Borrelia
forms for a successful treatment?
O. Brorson in vitro studies
1997 Report: Transformation of Cystic Forms of Borrelia burgdorferito Normal, Mobile Spirochetes
“the encysted forms developed into regular, mobilespirochetes after 6 weeks”
1998 ReportIn Vitro Conversion of Borrelia burgdorferi to CysticForms in Spinal Fluid, and Transformation to Mobile Spirochetes byIncubation in BSK-H Medium
“Normal, mobile spirochetes were inoculated into spinalfluid, and the spirochetes were converted to cysts(spheroplast L-forms) after 1-24 h. When these cystic formswere transferred to a rich BSK-H medium, the cysts wereconverted back to normal, mobile spirochetes”
Round bodies of Borrelia burgdorferi
Do they have clinical relevance?
Can they reproduce? Can they revert back to spirochetes in vivo?
Mursic et al 1996
MacDonald A 1988
Several round bodies along borreliae after 24 h ofincubation with ceftriaxone as shown by TransmissionElectron Microscope (TEM)
1.4m
Kersten et 1995
B. burgdorferi exposed to penicillin for 24 h. A vesicle isshown by TEM to adhere to the outer surface of aspirochete.
0.2 m
Kersten et 1995
Round bodies in vivo
Concurrent Neocortical Borreliosis and Alzheimer'sDisease Demonstration of a Spirochetal Cyst FormMacDonald A 1988
An unexpected observation was the identification of cystic forms of the Borreliaspirochete in dark-field preparations of cultured hippocampus
 As clinical persistence of Borrelia burgdorferi in patientswith active Lyme borreliosis occurs despite obviouslyadequate antibiotic therapy Mursic et al 1996
Conversion of Borrelia garinii Cystic Forms to MotileSpirochetes In VivoGrunter et al 2001
B. garinii cystic forms maintain their capability to reconvert into normal spirochetesnot only in vitro but also in vivo and can therefore be considered infective, at least inBALB/c mice.” “Dormant borreliae evacuated in cysts might be resistant to antibiotics (dueto low metabolic activity) and stage under non-optimal environmental conditions. Borrelialcystic forms could therefore be responsible for the frequent failures of antibiotictherapy and for the commonly reported relapses of Lyme disease.
Agents for the cystic forms (RB)
An In Vitro Study of the Susceptibility of Mobile andCystic Forms of Borrelia burgdorferi to MetronidazoleBrorson et al 1999
“ B. burgdorferi has the ability to make cystic forms both in vivo and invitro, e.g. when exposed to antibiotics commonly used for treatingLyme borreliosis. This phenomenon, combined with the abilityof the cysts to reconvert to normal mobile spirochetes mayexplain a reactivation of the disease after an illusory cure – andnot a “post Lyme syndrome” as postulated by otherresearchers.”
Additional Brorson et al in vitro studies for the antibioticsensitivity of the cystic (round bodies) form
2001 Susceptibility of motile and cystic forms of Borreliaburgdorferi to ranitidine bismuth citrate. Int Microbiol, 4(4):209-15.
2002 An in vitro study of the susceptibility of mobile and cysticforms of Borrelia burgdorferi to hydroxychloroquine IntMicrobiol, 5(1):25-31.
2004 An in vitro study of the susceptibility of mobile and cysticforms of Borrelia burgdorferi to tinidazole. Int Microbiol, 7(2):139-40.
“Destruction of spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi round-bodies by Tigecycline”Brorson et al 2009
Figure 3 showing round bodies treated with tigecycline (Panel A   0.05 g/ml and
Panel D >.05 g/ml) treated for 5 weeks          Bar: 5 m
Red stain: Dead
Green stain: Viable
Ineffectiveness of Tigecycline against PersistentBorrelia burgdorferi in vivo
Genetically altered non-cultivatable B. burgdorferi couldbe isolated from mice treated with ceftriaxone andtigecycline.
Mice remained infected with non-dividing, butinfectious spirochetes, particularly when antibiotictreatment was commenced during the chronic stage ofinfection
Barthold et al 2010
PCR data3 weeks
Barthold et al 2010
PCR data4 months
Barthold et al 2010
Tibiotarsal and heart tissue from these mice transplantedinto a immuncompromised SCID mice
Barthold et al 2010
LYMEPOLICYWONK: Was EMBERS’S study hidden for 12years?
Fish.jpg
So what can we do now ????
What other escape route Borrelia couldhave??
Penicillin effect on Borrelia burgdorferi
Rao, PD, Kollisetti, V, Sapi E. Unpublished data 2008
Figure2penicillin experimentBb
Figure1penicillinviability
Borrelia in Skin 2
K. Eisendle et al. AJCP2007,127:213-222Acrodermatitis ChronicaAtrophicansImmunohistochemistry
“Granular forms of B burgdorferi in a“colony” with a “Reddish veil”
Borrelial lymphocytoma with medusa-like colony of Borrelia.
Eisendle et al 2007
Morphea Eisendle
Morphea – with biofilm-like “clump” of Borrelia
Eisendle et al, “ Morphea” a manifestation of infection withBorrelia species”, British J Dermatology 2007
Alzheimer brain culture 1987 002
Spirochete Granular and Cyst 052
Human brain culturedemonstrating a potentialbiofilm of Borrelia burgdorferi
Year 1987
Tick gut culture showing Borreliaburgdorferi in a potential biofilmUnit
 Year 1981
Kurtti TJ et al 1987
Borrelia burgdorferi B31 colony on agarose
Dunham-Ems et al 2009
B. burgdorferi in nymphal midgut during feeding  inthe form of epithelial cell–associated networks
Miklossy J et al  2008
Borrelia burgdorferi colonies
dec 8 b31 motion001 annotated
Borrelia burgdorferi “Photo 51”
Alan MacDonald 2008
MacDonald A, & Sapi E: Biofilms of Borrelia burgdorferiin chronic cutaneous borreliosisAJCP 2008 June
We propose the hypothesis that that Borrelia burgdorferican form biofilm structures in lymphocytomas andacrodermatitis chronica atrophicans.
Our close examination of these pictures revealed strikingsimilarity to previously published biofilm pictures and ourpreliminary findings on specific biofilm-like colony formationof Borrelia burgdorferi when cultured in the presence ofhuman plasma
The idea is also featured in Under our Skin movie 2008
What are Biofilms?
collections of microorganisms (bacteria, yeasts, andprotozoa) that form on a hard surface (exceptionfloating biofilms)
examples: plaque that forms on teeth and the slimethat forms on surfaces in watery areas (shower)
surrounded by slimy secretions:mucoidpolysaccharide structure which attaches thecommunity to a surface
estimated that over 90% of bacteria live in biofilm
Benefits of biofilm environment to themicroorganism
Resistance to adverse environment: hightemp, pH, antibiotics, anti-fouling agents(limited toxin penetration, stationary grow)
Synergism between species andmetabolisms – multispecies biofilm –sharethe task?
Domination of immediate environment
Easy to transmit genetic material
Uses of Biofilms
Often used to purify water in water treatmentplants (sulfide removal)
Removal of heavy metals
Biohydrogen as energy source
Used in agriculture and biotechnology
Application in agriculture andbiotechnology
Biofilms formed by nitrogen fixing bacteria and phosphatesolubilizing fungi are beneficial for crop growth
Application of fungal Rhizobium biofilm reported to increaseN2 fixation in soybean by 30%, compared to a singleinoculation with Rhizobium.
Cellulolytic enzyme activity and productivity of Aspergillusniger in biofilm was higher by 40 and 55 % than that attainedby planktonic cultures.
Saccharomyces cerevisiae forms biofilms in packed bedcontinuous bioreactors, to produce ethanol from molasses.
                                     Sunita Gaind: Biofilms: their role in agriculture
Problems caused by biofilmformation
Damage to industrial equipment
Contamination of food, pharmaceutical andmedical products
Energy loss through inefficient energytransfer
Medical infections and antibiotic resistance
Microorganisms found in medicaldevices
Staphylococcus
Streptococcus
Enterococcus
E. coli
Klebsiella
Pseudomonas
Bacteria may originate from the skin of thepatient, or a healthcare worker and tap water
Common biofilms
Dental plaque
Bacterial endocarditis
Urinary tract infections
Cystic fibrosis
Staphylococcus osteomyelitis
Middle ear infection
Chronic prostatitis
Infectious kidney stones
Doxycycline treated biofilm and spirochete
Red stain: Dead
Green stain: Viable
D. Luecke, Kaur N  and  E Sapi unpublished data 2010
400x
1000x
Potential biofilm formation of Borrelia burgdorferi
biofilm is a structuredcommunity of microorganismsencapsulated within a self-developed polymeric matrix andadherent to a living or inertsurface.
Bacterial biofilms are verydifficult to treat because theyshow much greater resistance toantibiotics (up to 1000-fold)than their free-livingcounterparts.
Responsible for several chronicdiseases, such as chronic lunginfection in cystic fibrosispatients, chronic urinaryinfection, chronic middle earinfection, sinusitis, and evenfatal endocarditis.
biofilm
Azano D, Carpenter K, MacDonald and Sapi E, unpublished pictures,2008
THE PLAN: 2009
1. Reevaluate all antimicrobial agents for allforms of Borrelia, starting with:
Spirochetes
Round bodies
Biofilm-like colonies
2. Reevaluate the current techniques for cultureand antibiotic evaluation:
Microdilution method – direct counting (Baclightstaining
Culturing in plates contra tubes
Microplate contra small tubes
Are they provide different growing environmentfor Borrelia?
Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) & MinimumBactericidal Concentration (MBC) determination by differentmethods
Sapi E et al 2011
Effect of Doxycyline of the Spirochete and RoundBody formation of Borrelia burgdorferi (72h)
Sapi E et al 2011
Effect of Metranidazole of the Spirochete andRound Body Formation of Borrelia burgdorferi (72h)
Sapi E et al 2011
Effect of Tinidazole of the Spirochete and RoundBody formation of Borrelia burgdorferi (72h)
Sapi E et al 2011
Effect of Tigecycline of the Spirochete and RoundBody formation of Borrelia burgdorferi (72h)
Sapi E et al 2011
Effect of Different Antibiotics of the Spirocheteand Round Body formation of Borrelia burgdorferi  -3 weeks
Sapi E et al 2011
Effect of Different Antibiotics of the Spirocheteand Round Body formation of Borrelia burgdorferi  -3 weeks
Sapi E et al 2011
Evaluation of live/dead spirochete and roundbody forms of B. burgdorferi following variousantibiotics treatment
Sapi E et al 2011
Evaluation of live/dead spirochete and roundbody forms of B. burgdorferi following variousantibiotics treatment
Sapi E et al 2011
Visualization of spirochete and round body forms of Borrelia followingantibiotic treatment (72h)  400x magnification    -     Sapi E et al 2011
Effect of different antibiotics on the spirochete formationof Borrelia burgdorferi – 72h
Kaur N, Datar A and Sapi E unpublished data 2009
Effect of different antibiotics on the round bodyformation of Borrelia burgdorferi – 72h
Kaur N, Datar A and Sapi E unpublished data 2009
Borrelia burgdorferi B31 treated with variousantibiotics
Kaur N, Datar A and Sapi E unpublished data 2010
But how about Borrelia biofilm???
How do you test the antibiotic effect on biofilm?
Crystal violet staining and evaluation technique
Measure only the amount of biofilm mass but does notdetermine whether it is viable – can be useful?
BacLight live/dead method – it is a very good viabilityassay for overall viability inside of the biofilm
Effect of antibiotics on the biofilm-like colonies ofBorrelia measured by crystal violet staining
Sapi E et al 2011
BiofilmAntibiotics2011.jpg
Effect of antibiotics on the biofilm-like colonies of Borreliameasured BacLight staining
Red stain: Dead
Green stain: Viable
Doxycycline treated Borrelia burgdorferi biofilm
Red stain: Dead
Green stain: Viable
D. Luecke,Datar A,  Kaur N  and  E Sapi  2010
Treatment of Borrelia biofilm with various antibiotics and
evaluation by crystal violet staining method
Kaur N, Datar A and Sapi E unpublished data 2010
So how can we eliminate Borrelia biofilm?
Other Antibiotics?
Herbal agents like Samento, Banderol, Garlic?
Enzymes to open up the biofilm????
D - amino acid??? Kolodkin-Gal I et al 2010 Science
Comparison of the effect of Doxycycline, Samento extract andBanderol extract on the different morphological forms of Borreliaburgdorferi   - 96 h
Dx_Samento_Banderolfigure.jpg
SPIROCHETE
CYST
Datar A et al  2010
Effect of Samento, Banderol and Doxycyline on the biofilmformation of Borrelia burgdorferi  (BacLight staining)
C:\Users\akshita\LYME RESEARCH\THESIS\Thesis-II Winter 2010\Lab reports\Aki\image_2232.tif
C:\Users\akshita\LYME RESEARCH\THESIS\Thesis-II Winter 2010\Lab reports\Aki\image_2227.tif
C:\Users\akshita\LYME RESEARCH\THESIS\Thesis-II Winter 2010\Lab reports\Lab report 13_BacLight staining\image_2235.tif
C:\Users\akshita\LYME RESEARCH\THESIS\Thesis-II Winter 2010\Lab reports\Aki\image_2242.tif
C:\Users\akshita\LYME RESEARCH\LYME DISEASE SYMPOSIUM-UNH 5 th May 2010\DEV4_DEV6_2010_03_18_000271_dluec1_100XOIL_DAPI-FITC-TxRed_ESN042_T1_R1_baclightstain of Bb_discard.jpg
Control
Samento 1:300
Samento+Banderol 1:300
Banderol 1:300
Doxy 250g/ml
Red: dead cells
Green: viable cells
Datar A, Kaur N, Luecke D and Sapi E Townsend Letter 2010
Borrelia burgdorferi treated with 25 microgram/ml ofdoxycyline for 3 weeks
D. Luecke, Kaur N, Datar A  and  E Sapi unpublished data 2010
Recent Projects  of our Borrelia BiofilmResearch
To test the efficiency of anti-microbial agentson the prevention and elimination of Borreliabiofilm
Study the unique features of Borrelia biofilmwith the goal to find novel therapeutic targets
THE NEW PROJECT - 2012:
“Differential Gene Expression During Biofilm formation ofBorrelia burgdorferi”
Lyme Disease Studies at UNHsupported by the Turn the CornerFoundation/2008 -2012
“Detection of other novel pathogens in Ixodesscapularis ticks”
The purpose of this study is to identify microfilarial nematodes(worms) as potential tick-borne human pathogens in the US.
“Biofilm formation of Borrelia burgdorferi”
The purpose of this study is to establish and study BorreliaBiofilm formation of Borrelia burgdorferi”
THE NEW PROJECT - 2011:
“Differential Gene Expression During Biofilm formation ofBorrelia burgdorferi”
Lyme Disease Studies at UNHsupported by the Lyme Disease Foundation/2010-12
Study of  the biofilm structure of Borrelia burgdorferi
Aim 1: To study the structural components ofBorrelia biofilm using atomic force, scanningelectron, differential interference contrast andfluorescent microscopy techniques. 
Aim 2: Characterization of Borrelia biofilmcomponents using RAMAN spectrometry and in situfluorescent  staining methods.
Lyme Disease Studies at UNH supported by CalifornianLyme Disease Association  / 2010
An in vitro evaluation of antibiotic susceptibility ofdifferent morphological forms of Borrelia burgdorferi”
The goal of this research is to test the in vitro effects of variousantibiotics on different morphological forms of Borreliaburgdorferi.
AIM  1: To test in vitro susceptibility of spirochete and cyst forms of Borreliaburgdorferi to different antibiotics used for Lyme disease treatment.
AIM 2: To examine the optimal in vitro combinations of these antibiotics thatcan eliminate the different forms of Borrelia burgdorferi, as demonstrated byviability and microscopic assays
Lyme Disease Symposiums at theUniversity of New Haven
May 12, 2006 “Current Trends in Lyme Disease Research
                                             80 attendants
May 19, 2007 Current Trends in Lyme Disease Research”
                                        230 attendants
May 17, 2008 “Understanding and Treating Lyme Disease: Choicesand Challenges”              250 attendants
May 8, 2010 “The Challenges of Lyme Disease: EmergingResearch - Pediatric Care              200 attendants
May 21, 2011 “Breakthroughs in Lyme Disease Research”
     150 attendants
Special Thanks To:
University of New Haven and College of A&S for funding our studies.
Turn the Corner Foundation, CALDA, LDA, CT Lyme Riders Inc forsupporting our research
Turn the Corner and Schwartz Foundation for providing a “state of the art”microscopes for our morphological studies
Dr. Roman Zajac, Dr. Michael Rossi, Dr. Saion Sinha and Jennifer DianaM.S. at Department of Biology and Environmental Science (UNH) foradditional support and funds
The UNH Lyme Research Group (2004-2011):
1. Michelle Hessberger MS, Jeremy Bober MS, Michelle Montagna MS
2. Brandon Guida MS,Yogita Verma PhD, MS, Murali Reddy MS, MeeraRaman MS, Marianne Tawadros MS
3. Donna Rhoads MS, Pushpa Rao MS, Sonali Solanski MS, RaghavenderReddy MS, Kristin Bovat MS, Sumyuktha Komarigiri MS
4. Diane Azano MS, Katie Carpenter, Jamie Mille MSr, Kyrle Luth
     5. Akshita Datar MS, Navroop Kaur MS, David Luecke, Cedric Mpoy,Namrata Pabbati MS, Bien-Aime Lubraine MS, Seema Patel MS, SamAnyanwu MS, Ashley Taylor MS, Yram Foli MS, Nicola Ricker MS, ScottBastian, Shilpa Madari MS, Michael Feulner MS, Amy Rattelle MS
 
 
UNH Lyme Disease Research Group2011 May 21st
Lyme Disease Symposium 2011grouppicture.jpg